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A new anti-disinformation campaign is being launched in the European Union with the lofty objective of protecting democratic systems in coming elections, reports Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

There’s a problem, though, contends Judith Bergman, a columnist, lawyer and political analyst who serves as distinguished senior fellow at the Gatestone Institute.

The EU already is deeply entrenched in disinformation.

The new comprehensive “Action Plan against Disinformation,” she writes, is the result of a request from member states to the European Commission come up “with specific proposals for a coordinated EU response to the challenge of disinformation.”

The proposal, unveiled in December, focuses on detecting disinformation, responding in a coordinated fashion, having online platforms ensure “transparency of political advertising,” cracking down on fake accounts and “empowering citizens.”

On that last point, “EU institutions and member states will promote media literacy through dedicated programs.”

“Support will be provided to national multidisciplinary teams of independent fact-checkers and researchers to detect and expose disinformation campaigns across social networks.”

The plan, as it is structured, Bergman explained, is based on a previously established “Code of Practice on Disinformation” to which tech giants Facebook, Google and others agreed.

Explained Bergman, “It sounds noble: The EU wants to protect citizens from ‘fake news’ and from the interference in national and European democratic processes by foreign powers such as Russia.

“The problem is that this professedly noble initiative comes from an organization that has already for several years been censoring speech in Europe, thereby making it difficult to take these stated intentions at face value.”

For the rest of this report, and more, please go to Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

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