"The Peanuts Movie" features Charlie Brown trying to win over the affection of a little red-haired girl. (Photo: YouTube, Fox Family Entertainment)

“The Peanuts Movie” features Charlie Brown trying to win over the affection of a little red-haired girl. (Photo: YouTube, Fox Family Entertainment)

It is no longer good enough for Charlie Brown to love the little red-haired girl.

Variety magazine released its review on Monday for “The Peanuts Movie,” and lovable loser Charlie Brown is taken to task for not pining over a minority.

“Like most classic jokes, ‘Peanuts’ isn’t so much funny as mildly amusing, which is evidently one of the many aspects of [Charles M.] Schulz’s legacy that his son Craig and grandson Bryan fought to protect as screenwriters and producers on the film (evidently trumping genuinely hilarious collaborator Paul Feig),” Variety wrote. “But a little modernization wouldn’t have hurt, especially in the diversity department. While Franklin remains Charlie Brown’s only brown friend, a non-white love interest would have been as progressive as Schulz’s tomboyish depiction of Peppermint Patty was back in the day.”

Media watchdog Newsbusters lamented the magazine’s desire to politicize the “Peanuts” gang, saying, “As usual, cultural commissars think ‘tomboyish’ is code for ‘lesbian’ or ‘transgender,’ so perhaps next they will demand Chuck discuss gender fluidity with ‘Peppermint Patrick.'”

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Americans were first introduced to Schulz’s creation in daily newspaper strips in 1950. The popularity of “Peanuts” propelled it to television specials, musicals, and new comic strips until February 13, 2000, the day after Schulz’s death.

The new movie centers around attempts by Charlie Brown and his dog Snoopy to win over respective love interests.

“The Peanuts Movie,” directed by Steve Martino, opens in theaters Friday, Nov. 6.

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