The whole world, pretty much, is mourning for Nelson Mandela today.

But most are not mourning for the real Mandela. They are, in fact, mourning for the myth of Mandela.

He was not Martin Luther King Jr. He was not Mahatma Gandhi. And he was certainly not George Washington, as Barack Obama claimed.

He was a committed member of the South African Communist Party. He was a leader of the revolutionary African National Congress, which he helped to radicalize into an organization sworn to armed, violent attacks.

Maybe you say: “But Farah, he was fighting against the evil of Apartheid!”

Yes, that is true. Apartheid was inarguably an evil and unjustifiable system. But so is the system Mandela’s revolution brought about – one in which anti-white racism is so strong today that a prominent genocide watchdog group has labeled the current situation a “precursor” to the deliberate, systematic elimination of the race.

Advanced societies don’t just die. They can actually be finished off by other Western societies

In other words, the world has been sold a bill of goods about Mandela. He wasn’t the saintly character portrayed by Morgan Freeman. He wasn’t someone fighting for racial equality. He was the leader of a violent, Communist revolution that has nearly succeeded in all of its grisly horror.

But don’t believe me.

I’ve never been to South Africa – not during Apartheid and not after.

Instead, listen to Sonia Hruska. She was an early supporter of Mandela and worked in his administration.

“After about six years,” Hruska said, “I realized something serious is wrong; the communist elements are taking over, it’s not what we were promised.”

What did she see that the rest of the world missed?

“As a business owner, I can get 25 years in jail time if I do employ a white person, for instance,” she said. “It is totally ridiculous; you cannot have imagined that affirmative action could have gone so far.”

Today, in South Africa’s white population of 4 million, 1 million live in utter poverty.

Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss.

Hruska describes routine, violent, racist atrocities of almost unimaginable proportions: Kidnap murders, home invasions, gang rapes.

“It’s heinous torture,” Hruska explained. “Even children as young as 2 months old get burned with hot water, get wrapped in newspaper and burned.”

In the case of one family, Hruska described a black mob breaking into a home, waiting for the white family to get home, then raping the mother in front of the father and son to see. Then, after killing the mother, they killed the father and son by plunging them into boiling water.

She said: “There is no easy way of saying exactly how these people are tortured. The standard would be a hot iron, electric iron, boiling water … and these are carried out for hours.”

You will read today many stories describing Mandela as a “political prisoner.”

In fact, he served 27 years in prison for 23 specific acts of sabotage and attempting to overthrow the government.

It was only a year ago that some of the international press began to report the truth about Mandela for the first time. Last December, the London Telegraph reported that, indeed, the records showed Mandela was not only a member of the South African Communist Party, he held a “senior rank.”

By the way, Mandela was offered his freedom while incarcerated many times. All he had to do was renounce terrorism. He wouldn’t do it.

Of course, it’s fashionable to forget about all of this today. Nelson Mandela is dead. He is being proclaimed a saint all over the world.

Nevertheless, these inconvenient truths need to be stated by someone because the Mandela mythology is as dangerous as the terror he and his followers perpetrated on so many innocent victims – white and black.

 

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