The most decorated living U.S. military man, Gen. Patrick Henry Brady, not only says putting women in direct combat won’t work – he bluntly states “women pose an insane burden on readiness.” He cites a slew of insurmountable battlefield problems, from the physical to the psychological, in an exclusive WND column today.

In his 34 years of service, Brady found that women had fewer disciplinary problems than men, “but could not carry their load physically – loading litters in choppers, carrying wounded to safety, even lifting tool chests.” He says that left men to cover for them, “often causing us to use two people when one should have done the job – all of which affected readiness.” The general also found women ineffective in the field due to such problems as feminine hygiene, pregnancy, sexual distractions, favoritisms, fraternization and assault.

But Brady sees another big hurdle to women in combat. They’re not designed to kill. “And they will not be good at it,” he says. “God designed them to produce life and nurture it, not destroy it. They don’t belong in the trenches of the NFL or in the octagon in Ultimate Fighting; combat is the ultimate Ultimate Fighting – and they don’t belong there, either.”

“Imagine a draft,” he says, “and a nation forcing our women into killing units. Visualize what will happen to women POWs, not to mention homosexuals, captured by our most likely enemies.” Additionally, he believes women could get pregnant to avoid deployment.

He also sees problems for men fighting alongside women. “Most men will not treat women as they do other men – thankfully. And there is no intention to do so despite what we hear. Male bonding, immeasurable to success in combat, would be damaged.”

Brady, a retired U.S. Army major general and helicopter pilot, was awarded America’s highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for a series of rescues during the Vietnam War in which he used 3 helicopters to rescue over 60 wounded. At the end of the day his aircraft had over 400 holes in them from enemy fire and mines. In two tours in Vietnam he flew over 2,500 combat missions and rescued over 5,000 wounded. Some pundits recognize him as the most decorated living veteran.

Get the whole story: Read Gen. Patrick Brady’s exclusive WND column, Women in foxholes.

Get the full account of Gen. Brady’s Vietnam rescue operations in his book, “Dead Men Flying,” a riveting tale from America’s most decorated living soldier – autographed!


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