The United States Army general credited with restoring order in post-Katrina New Orleans says Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel needs to ask for all the federal help he can get to fight the escalating violence in the city.

Retired Lt. Gen. Russel Honore, who served as the commander of Joint Task Force Katrina in 2005, told WLS-TV in Chicago that similar efforts are needed to restore order there.

“Well, you know, if we had a natural disaster, the mayor and the governor would be able to ask for a federal declaration and get all the government assistance to house and shelter people, and emergency power,” said Honore.

He continued: “We have a similar things happening on the human capital side. That is communities that are being exploited by violence where our citizens who spent their lives in these communities are not free. That shouldn’t happen in America. The mayor and governor should ask for federal assistance in all of government. I’m talking about healthcare, educational opportunities, dealing with mental health issues, after school programs, and additional police that should control our streets. This is America.”

When asked by WLS if the National Guard should patrol certain streets of Chicago, Honore stopped short of endorsing the idea.

“I think that the first thing you do is have an expansion of police, bringing in other police officers from cities around Chicago and the state to control the situation and maintain control in the part of the city that has the violence. And surveillance, it’s amazing what happens when you put cameras on every corner. Reinforce the liberties of the people to be able to walk the street so little girls like [15-year-old Hadiaya] Pendleton don’t get shot.”

Pendleton, who was in Washington for Obama’s inauguration, was shot and killed in a violent attack shortly after returning home.

The U.S. Department of Education recently awarded the Chicago Public School system $50,000 to “help recover from multiple shootings.”

The grant comes from Immediate Project School Emergency Response to Violence (SERV), which “will provide assistance for recovery efforts following 35 shootings this past year at four high schools in the Greater Englewood community.”

It is these areas of Chicago that Honore believes are in need of help.

He stressed that control was vital in restoring order in post-Katrina New Orleans, and the same measures must be enacted in Chicago.

“The government along with state and federal assets need to come and clean up Chicago like it was a natural disaster,” he said.

See the interview:

The death toll by murder in Chicago over the past decade is greater than the number of American forces who have died in Afghanistan since the beginning of Operation Enduring Freedom, according to a police analysis.

A WND review of the Chicago Police Department Murder Analysis reports from 2003 to 2011 provides a statistical breakdown of the demographics of both the victims and offenders in the 4,265 murders in Chicago over that time period.

The data show most of the city’s massive murder mayhem is black-on-black crime.

Honore addressed the issue, as he told Chicago’s WLS that”people are going to have to change.”

“We need a cultural change,” he said. “Too many of our major cities have the same kind of violence.”

Of the victims of murder in Chicago from 2003 to 2011, an average of 77 percent had a prior arrest history, with a high of 79 percent of the 436 murdered in Chicago in 2010 having arrest histories.

For the same 2003-2011 period, blacks were the victims of 75 percent of 4,265 murders. Blacks also were the offenders in 75 percent of the murders.

According to 2010 U.S. Census information, Chicago has a population of 2,695,598 people. The city is 33 percent black, 32 percent white (not Hispanic) and 30 percent Hispanic or Latino in origin.

For the 2003-2011 period, whites were nearly 6 percent of the victims and accused of carrying out 4 percent of the murders.

For the 2003-2011 period, Hispanics or Latinos were 19 percent of the victims and 20 percent of the offenders.

Between 2003 and 2011, 4,265 people were murdered in the city of Chicago. In 2012 alone, 512 people were murdered in the city.

Operation Enduring Freedom, the name for the war in Afghanistan, which started Oct. 7, 2001, has seen a total of 2,166 killed. The war has been ongoing for 11 years, 3 months and one week.

Operation Iraqi Freedom, the name for the war in Iraq, which started March 20, 2003, and ended Dec. 15, 2011, saw a total of 4,422 killed.

In a city with some of the toughest gun control laws in America, where a handgun cannot be purchased, Fox News reported that Chicago Police Supt. Garry McCarthy “acknowledged aiming at assault weapons misses the mark when dealing with Chicago’s gang violence.”

“The weapon used is generally a handgun, and rarely is it purchased through legal channels,” he said.


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