Anyone who thinks the globalist initiative to integrate North America on the model of the European Union is dead or beyond any hope of revival is badly mistaken.

Robert Pastor, for one – regarded as the “father of the North American Union” – fails to give up.

Today, American University’s School of International Relations in Washington, D.C., put out a press release making Pastor, professor of international relations and director of the Center for North American Studies, available to discuss with the media the sixth annual North American Leaders’ Summit, now going by the acronym NALS.

Jerome Corsi’s “America for Sale” uncovers globalist plans that threaten U.S. sovereignty

“After making no progress on the North American agenda,” Pastor said in Monday’s American University press release, “it is a relief they are finally meeting.”

“One hopes they will take concrete actions to promote competitiveness by creating a seamless market, reduce impediments on the border, foster educational opportunities in all three countries and articulate a vision of North America that will engender greater cooperation,” he said.

As WND reported, the trilateral North American summit has been downgraded from the heyday of the George W. Bush administration and the announcement of the Security and Prosperity Partnership, or SPP, at the meeting of Bush with Mexico’s then-President Vicente Fox and Canada’s then prime minister, Paul Martin, on March 23, 2005, in Waco, Texas.

Today, under the Obama administration, SPP-like meetings are being held, but under the less controversial “rebranded” and “refocused” structure designated as the “North American Leaders Summit.”

The most recent meeting, scheduled to follow the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Hawaii for Nov. 20, 2011, had to be canceled when Mexican President Felipe Calderon decided to remain home following the helicopter crash that killed Mexican Interior Minister Francisco Blake Mora.

The last NALS summit was held in Guadalajara, Mexico, in 2009</a. The next scheduled NALS summit, in 2011, was canceled.

At the conclusion of Monday’s NALS summit at the White House, the three North American leaders held a joint press conference in the Rose Garden at which President Obama fielded questions about whether or not the Supreme Court would overturn Obamacare.

With any mention of the continuing gun-walking scandal known as “Fast and Furious,” the three leaders once again pledged to combat the Mexican drug war, without proposing any concrete solutions to stop Mexican drug cartel violence from spilling across the border into the United States.

‘The North American idea’

As recently as 2008, WND reported Pastor had declared that his North American dream was “dead.”

He correctly predicted in the July/August 2008 issue of the Council on Foreign Relations magazine Foreign Affairs that the president following George W. Bush would discard the SPP.

At its height, WND reported that the SPP had some 20 different working groups composed of policymakers and bureaucrats from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. They worked in joint committees spanning a wide range of issues, from commerce, to aviation policy, to border security and immigration – all without the approval of a treaty by the Senate and without congressional approval or oversight of working group participation by dozens of U.S. federal government employees.

WND previously reported that on page 11 of his 2011 Oxford University-published book “The North American Idea: A Vision of a Continental Europe,” Pastor attacked WND by suggesting its reporting on the plans Pastor advanced for North American integration amounted to nothing more than baseless “conspiracy theory”:

In “The Late Great USA: The Coming Merger with Mexico and Canada,” Jerome Corsi makes a conspiratorial case that George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, the Council on Foreign Relations, and me, were secretly conspiring to create a North American Union in the same way that Jean Monnet and others established the European Union – step-by-step. “Our national sovereignty is in danger,” he warned.

Two paragraphs later, Pastor sharpened his attack by a disparaging reference to two unrelated books, “Unfit for Command: Swift Boat Veterans Speak Out Against John Kerry,” published in 2004, and “The Obama Nation: Leftist Politics and the Cult of Personality,” published in 2008:

Corsi, who wrote a book impugning John Kerry’s service in Vietnam and another attacking Barack Obama, developed arguments that the John Birch Society and Phyllis Schlafly’s Eagle Forum used to try to show that the SPP [Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America] was a first step toward a North American Union (NAU). Together, they persuaded conservative legislators to introduce bills in twenty-three states that condemned the NAU and also a nonexistent NAFTA superhighway.

The NAU agenda

Before killing the SPP website completely, Obama did follow Pastor’s advice, first by migrating SPP.gov to contain unrelated Commerce Department content, then by killing the website altogether – even though a SPP website remains operative in Canada.

While the 20 working groups appear to have been disbanded when the SPP was formally abandoned, the Obama administration nevertheless continues to advance the NAU agenda below the radar of national public opinion.

On Feb. 4, 2011, for instance, the Obama administration signed without congressional approval a joint declaration with Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Canada titled “Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness.”

Then, WND reported the decision to declare a continental perimeter for the United States and Canada was designed to effectively combine the two nations in mutual national security and economic efforts.

The agreement affirmed the Obama administration’s decision to implement the key objectives of the SPP to avoid the public scrutiny that dogged President George W. Bush after he openly proclaimed with the SPP his plans for North American integration.

Without doubt, the “Beyond the Border” declaration followed the blueprint Pastor as co-chairman published in a 2005 Council on Foreign Relations report, “Building a North American Community.”

That report called on page xvii of the forward for the “establishment by 2010 of a North American economic and security perimeter, the boundaries of which would be defined by a common external tariff and an outer security perimeter.”

Notably, the “Beyond the Border” declaration created a new Beyond the Border Working Group, designated by the acronym BBWG.

According to the joint declaration, the BBWG, composed of “representatives from the appropriate departments and offices of our respective federal governments,” was tasked with developing a “Plan of Action” to realize the goals of the declaration and to report annually to the “Leaders,” specified as the president of the United States and the prime minister of Canada.


Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.