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WASHINGTON – Iran reports that it has developed a version of the much-vaunted Russian S-300 air defense missile which Moscow last year refused to export to the Islamic republic. The concern at that point was that the export could have been a violation of one of the few United Nations sanctions Russia agreed to because of Iran’s nuclear program, according to a report in Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

Sources say that the Iranian version of the S-300, dubbed the Bavar (Belief) 373, is just as effective as the Russian version, suggesting possible collusion between the two countries in its development. One Iranian source said that technology from China also is incorporated in the indigenously built Iranian air defense missile.

The Bavar 373 is set to be delivered soon to the country’s integrated air defense network. Commander of Khatam ol-Anbia Air Defense Base Brig. Gen. Farzad Esmayeeli said that the system is even more powerful and more advanced than the Russian S-300, claiming that it even could become a rival to the Russian version when it comes to exports.

Iranian sources suggest that the Bavar 373 will be mobile, with four loaded on each mobile truck launcher. It also will be able to undertake a cold launch from systems similar to existing missiles, such as the Tor-M1. These sources also indicate that the Iranians may even develop a shorter range missile that would be used to protect the Bavar 373 launch sites.

Since the Bavar will be operational shortly, mobile batteries undoubtedly will be positioned near Iran’s nuclear facilities sprinkled throughout the country for security purposes. Once the Bavar missile batteries are on location, there is every expectation that the air defense missile system will be formidable should either Israel or the United States, or both, decide to launch an attack on those nuclear facilities.

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