EPA researchers publishing a study in the Feb. 16 issue of Environmental Science & Technology were “surprise[d]” to find a worldwide jump in the incidence of autism beginning in 1988.

Thus, the study concluded, “Although the debate about the nature of increasing autism continues, the potential for this increase to be real and involve exogenous environmental stressors exists.”

According to the Sound Choice Pharmaceutical Institute, 1988 was the year the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices added a second dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine to its list of recommendations.

SCPI actually found three “change points” in autism trends – 1981, 1988 and 1995. Here is what correlated to those years:

All three of those vaccines contained and contain aborted human fetal cells.

I’d always read it was mercury in vaccines that was implicated in autism. But according to SCPI:

Interestingly, the vaccines that can be associated with the autism trend change points never contained mercury, and some animal-produced vaccines used universally in the U.S. before 1979 contained levels of mercury as high, if not higher, than current levels.

The EPA study relied on previous studies to deny a link between autism and vaccines whatsoever. But there is a new wrinkle. NaturalNews.com reported April 12:

One of the central figures in the Center for Disease Control’s claims about vaccine safety is reported to be under investigation by Danish police after almost $2 million turned up missing that was supposed to have been spent on research.

Dr. Poul Thorsen, one of the researchers involved in two highly publicized autism reports published in the influential New England Journal of Medicine, was accused of fraud last month. …

Thorsen’s Danish studies from 2002 and 2003 are widely referred to by groups that dispute the vaccine connection to autism and nervous system disorders. …

Thorsen … is a psychiatrist and not a research scientist or toxicologist. … In all, CDC is reported to have paid Thorsen’s center $14.6 million since 2002. …

In addition, Thorsen’s partner Kreesten Madsen recently came under fire after damning e-mails surfaced showing Madsen working with CDC officials intent on fraudulently cherry-picking facts to prove vaccine safety.

While the CDC and co-authors of those studies insist on their veracity, liberals, who believe there is a link between autism and mercury in vaccines, called for an investigation:

“Questions about Thorsen’s scientific integrity may finally force CDC to rethink the vaccine protocols since most of the other key pro-vaccine studies cited by CDC rely on the findings of Thorsen’s research group,” Robert F. Kennedy Jr. wrote on the Huffington Post. “The validity of all these studies is now in question.”

It would be ironic if the liberal demand for additional research helped lead to a confirmed link between autism and vaccines containing aborted fetal cells.

Meanwhile, in light of the EPA’s findings, SCPI is calling for a Fair Labeling and Informed Consent Act so parents can make an educated decision whether to allow their children to receive vaccinations containing aborted human fetal cells.

SCPI is also calling for more studies. SCPI President Theresa Deisher told me by phone, “The research thus far is too compelling and too closely associated across decades and across continents. The rise in autism is real. People can no longer brush it off. And vaccines containing fetal cells are a very plausible environmental trigger that must be investigated.”

Pro-aborts lambasted a blog post I wrote on the questionable link between autism and vaccines containing fetal cells. Amanda Marcotte at Pandagon wrote:

[A]nti-choicers are running with a bull—t story that vaccines are made with aborted fetuses, and that’s what causes autism. This article and the one it banks off of from Jill Stanek are both amazing examples of what can be produced when a person has no respect for their audience’s intelligence or the truth.

Marcotte began by disputing that the aforementioned vaccines are made from aborted fetal cells:

The claim that vaccines are made from aborted fetuses is farcical on its face. But it shouldn’t be surprising. I think your rank-and-file anti-choicers probably believe that stem cells are cultivated from aborted fetuses (they’re actually taken from embryos created for IVF that were going to be thrown away if not used in research), and that they’re already being used in standard medical care like vaccines (they’re not). …

The assertion that vaccines are made from aborted fetuses is such a weird idea that I don’t imagine the EPA even examined that assertion in the first place.

So let’s clear up that they are.

All vaccines in question – rubella, MMR and chicken pox – among others, are derived from either the MRC-5 or WI-38 cell lines.

According to the National Network for Immunization Information, among numerous sources (Google “WI-38 aborted” or “MRC-5 aborted” for more validations, such as this Salon article, or footnote 1 on this Merck label or even Wikipedia), “WI-38 came from lung cells from a female fetus of three months’ gestation and MRC-5 was developed from lung cells from a 14-week-old male fetus. Both fetuses were intentionally aborted.”

Marcotte was right that the EPA hasn’t investigated the potential connection. Dr. Deisher told me Thorsen and his research team “never accounted for the covariants containing residual produced using human fetal cells. This wasn’t even on their radar.”

Dr. Deisher has had a different experience when discussing this issue with abortion proponents. “One can be pro-abortion and want safe vaccines for their children and all children. One can be pro-abortion and object to the cannibalization of aborted children. Philosophically, they are sickened by the thought of injecting their child with the DNA of an aborted fetus.”

Marcotte, childless, is in no position to argue in favor of recommending another’s child as a human science experiment. Apparently it is no great leap for hardcore pro-death ideologues to advance from endorsing human-embryo research to endorsing human-child research.

Nor, I noted, did Marcotte suggest another reason for the spike in autism beginning in 1988.

But concerned parents can find alternatives to aborted-fetal vaccines at this Michigan Right to Life link.


Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.